Property
Moving into uncharted waters
Joseph Wong | 31 Aug 2018 00:30
Most people would frown upon the idea of integrating social (affordable) housing with high-end residential developments. One of the main reasons many would oppose such integration projects is the impact on property valuation.

Integrated living structures would however see a narrowing of the social divide between the poor and the rich.

Integrated housing projects are more prevalent in developed nations like the United Kingdom (UK), but modified versions are starting to emerge within the Kuala Lumpur city centre.

An integrated living concept would mean that buyers in this market segment can afford a home and enjoy the facilities and close amenities that the project may offer, says a property observer.

“The lower income group in normal circumstances cannot afford homes closer to the city or in higher end developments,” he says.

Already, local property developers are starting to allocate parts of their development portfolio for social housing to cater to the lower income group, particularly the B40 segment, which is the bottom 40% of households with monthly income of RM3,900 and below.

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